2013 Saskatchewan Road Trip

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2013 Saskatchewan Road Trip, a set on Flickr.Slide show from Saskatchewan Road Trip, Summer 2013

seattle_saskatchewan_2013-80seattle_saskatchewan_2013-91-Editseattle_saskatchewan_2013-109seattle_saskatchewan_2013-144-Edit-2

2013 Saskatchewan Road Trip, a set on Flickr.

Slide show from Saskatchewan Road Trip, Summer 2013

@davechiu: Stage 8: Castres to Ax 3 Domaines

davechiu-tdf:

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Hindsight is 20/20 as they say. Going into today, I thought that the fireworks at the finish would be more exciting than whatever happened on the HC Col de Pailhères. But I was wrong, the Col de Pailhères is gorgeous with sparse tree coverage leading to fantastic views and lots of fans. The…

Things to Read for the Wannabe Javascript Application Hacker

For the past couple years, I’ve been back working in a pure JavaScript/HTML/CSS framwork building a web app not based on the Flash runtime.  It’s been rewarding and educational.  With the boom in JavaScript framworks like AngularJS, Ember.JSBackboneSpine,JavaScriptMVC, you as a former Adobe Flex developer who worked with frameworks like PureMVC and Cairngorm are in a perfect situation to pick up these technologies quickly, mostly because you’re used to working in an asyncronous, event-driven environment.

As a former Adobe Flex developer, though, you owe it to yourself to checkout Angular.JS, by Google.

Anyway, here’s a quick reading list to expidite your learning:

  • JavaScript: The Good Parts - Read this to get a good basic understanding of how and why JavaScript works the way it does.  One you understand it’s prototype inheritance structures and how to work with modular development, you’re ready for the framworks.
  • JavaScript Web Applications - This book starts to guide you through a frameworkd for building and organizing single-page web applications.  Eventually, you’ll learn about the Ember.JS framework.  
  • AngularJS - The Google sponsored framework that’s about to go 1.0.  If you’re moving on from Adobe Flex, this framework should feel natural to you.  Two-way binding and declarative, MXML-like syntax will make you feel right at home, except without the heft of the Flash runtime.  Though, I’m not going to go into any details at all about the other JavaScript frameworks, you should be familiar with them.  Once you know the basics, the frameworks are pretty easy to work out.

Moving into a heavy JavaScript development environment will require understanding the following concepts:

1)  Learning the object-oriented features of JavaScript.  This is why you’ll read JavaScript: The Good Parts.

2)  Learning some form of client-side templating so that you can interact with raw JSON from the server.  Mustache.JS or JSRender (which I’m currently using in my home-grown cludged together framework).  Of course, you can manually process your JSON responses, but that’s no fun.

3)  Loading remote code and module management so you don’t write a big mess of pasta:Requrire.JS or Commons.JS

4)  Some UI Framework widgest and boiler plate like Bootstrap (eww) or Zurb Foundation (my preference becasue it doesn’t seem to be over-used like Bootstrap).

5)  JQuery and the million UI widgets created in it.  Especially anything related (Morris) tocharting, as HTML-based charting toolkits get better each and every week.

BTW, if you like syntactial sugar, you should definitely be checking out Coffee Script

And, finally, I’m currating some bookmark lists over on SpringPad with interesting projects and articles as I find them.  It’s because I’m too lazy to actually blog about this stuff. Check them out:

For the Web DeveloperFor the Python Web DeveloperJavaScript/WebUI Widgets

FINALLY, and most importantly, if you don’t like any of the current JavaScript frameworks, just wait a week.

Webshell - The API of APIs

Moleskine - Photo Books

If you like the look of the Moleskine but want to have custom printed photos inside….looks nice.  They come in 20 and 60 page versions.

Vimium - the hacker's browser

Things to Read for the Wannabe Javascript Application Hacker

For the past couple years, I’ve been back working in a pure JavaScript/HTML/CSS framwork building a web app not based on the Flash runtime.  It’s been rewarding and educational.  With the boom in JavaScript framworks like AngularJS, Ember.JS, Backbone, Spine, JavaScriptMVC, you as a former Adobe Flex developer who worked with frameworks like PureMVC and Cairngorm are in a perfect situation to pick up these technologies quickly, mostly because you’re used to working in an asyncronous, event-driven environment.

As a former Adobe Flex developer, though, you owe it to yourself to checkout Angular.JS, by Google.

Anyway, here’s a quick reading list to expidite your learning:

  • JavaScript: The Good Parts - Read this to get a good basic understanding of how and why JavaScript works the way it does.  One you understand it’s prototype inheritance structures and how to work with modular development, you’re ready for the framworks.
  • JavaScript Web Applications - This book starts to guide you through a frameworkd for building and organizing single-page web applications.  Eventually, you’ll learn about the Ember.JS framework.  
  • AngularJS - The Google sponsored framework that’s about to go 1.0.  If you’re moving on from Adobe Flex, this framework should feel natural to you.  Two-way binding and declarative, MXML-like syntax will make you feel right at home, except without the heft of the Flash runtime.  Though, I’m not going to go into any details at all about the other JavaScript frameworks, you should be familiar with them.  Once you know the basics, the frameworks are pretty easy to work out.

Moving into a heavy JavaScript development environment will require understanding the following concepts:

1)  Learning the object-oriented features of JavaScript.  This is why you’ll read JavaScript: The Good Parts.

2)  Learning some form of client-side templating so that you can interact with raw JSON from the server.  Mustache.JS or JSRender (which I’m currently using in my home-grown cludged together framework).  Of course, you can manually process your JSON responses, but that’s no fun.

3)  Loading remote code and module management so you don’t write a big mess of pasta: Requrire.JS or Commons.JS

4)  Some UI Framework widgest and boiler plate like Bootstrap (eww) or Zurb Foundation (my preference becasue it doesn’t seem to be over-used like Bootstrap).

5)  JQuery and the million UI widgets created in it.  Especially anything related (Morris) to charting, as HTML-based charting toolkits get better each and every week.

BTW, if you like syntactial sugar, you should definitely be checking out Coffee Script

And, finally, I’m currating some bookmark lists over on SpringPad with interesting projects and articles as I find them.  It’s because I’m too lazy to actually blog about this stuff. Check them out:

For the Web Developer, For the Python Web Developer, JavaScript/WebUI Widgets

FINALLY, and most importantly, if you don’t like any of the current JavaScript frameworks, just wait a week.

Photo

Interesting shell replacement for you command line geeks
(via fish’s fish shell)

Interesting shell replacement for you command line geeks

(via fish’s fish shell)

Photo

Working with some Python development, I went through a lot of hassle of using Homebrew to get Postgresql up and running on OS X.  Then at this week’s Boston Django meetup, Nate Aune turned me onto Vagrant for simple managing of VirtualBox VMs from the command line, complete with either Chef or Puppet provisioning.  
In less than an hour, I learned all these tools and now have an Ubuntu server VM up and running with a complete Django/Postgresql stack.  Dead simple and no need to clutter my host OS with a bunch of server configs.    Vagrant even creates a nice shared directory with the host OS so that you can still develop code with your favorite tools (like Sublime Text 2).
(via Vagrant - Virtualized development for the masses.)

Working with some Python development, I went through a lot of hassle of using Homebrew to get Postgresql up and running on OS X.  Then at this week’s Boston Django meetup, Nate Aune turned me onto Vagrant for simple managing of VirtualBox VMs from the command line, complete with either Chef or Puppet provisioning.  

In less than an hour, I learned all these tools and now have an Ubuntu server VM up and running with a complete Django/Postgresql stack.  Dead simple and no need to clutter my host OS with a bunch of server configs.    Vagrant even creates a nice shared directory with the host OS so that you can still develop code with your favorite tools (like Sublime Text 2).

(via Vagrant - Virtualized development for the masses.)